Please Help
Rebecca
Posted: February 11, 2019, 12:02 AM







I just feel so unhappy. I keep trying to quit but find it easier to fall back into drinking, any excuse. I just want to stop, get my life back and be happier. Please help!
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Posted: February 11, 2019, 7:34 AM


Posts: 2246
Joined: March 23, 2006



Hi Rebecca
There's lots of online chat rooms and things that can help you find out more about people who have drinking problems. You can also call your local AA office and you will find someone on the other end of the phone who will talk to you and help you.

Its such a scary place to be, wanting to stop drinkng but then starting to realise that you can't stop...its a horrible out of control, lonely, terrifying place.

But there is a solution...it is possible to stop and you don't have to do this alone.
Idgie

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Who of you by worrying can add a single hour to his life? Matthew 6:27

May the Force be with you.

Women and cats will do as they please, and men and dogs should just get used to the idea....Robert Heinlein.

You can spend the next 24 hours reaching your true potential or sliding down into your own particular hell. the choice is always yours.
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Posted: April 11, 2019, 9:12 AM


Posts: 4155
Joined: July 18, 2006



Hi, Rebecca.
It helped me a great deal to accept that I had an allergy to alcohol. The minute I put it into my body I wanted more, please. One was too many and a thousand not enough. The disease of alcoholism centers in the mind--an obsession that blots out all thought, and when I'm not drinking, I'm restless, irritable and discontented until I can find another drink. The craving starts over, and I begin again.
Consider an Open Meeting of AA. Nobody can tell your alcoholic or not alcoholic, but the only requirement for attending is that you have a desire to stop drinking.
You don't ever have to face your alcoholism alone again.
S

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Faith is not belief without proof, but trust without reservation.
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Posted: April 11, 2019, 7:25 PM


Posts: 6231
Joined: January 5, 2008



Hi. Rebecca. It is indeed a scary place to be when the realization comes that one is unable to stop drinking . I remember it quite well and would never want to go back there. That is why I work a daily program of recovery that helps me to live sober. AA is a good place to start . It will help you meet other people who are in the same situation as you and can fully understand your predicament. You will find support if you are willing to take it. If you are uncomfortable attending a face to face meeting you can do so online . The one that I liked best was stepchat.com.. Also you can read the Big Book of Alcoholic Anonymous at this link

https://www.aa.org/pages/en_US/alcoh...olics-anonymous

Take care and I hope you will post again...

This post has been edited by pirate on April 11, 2019, 7:26 PM



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Thank God for what you have. Trust God for what you need
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Posted: April 18, 2019, 9:21 AM


Posts: 3
Joined: March 24, 2019



Hi Rebecca, I created another posting a month ago since I have unused vivitrol that expires soon. Vivitrol is said to remove all cravings for alcohol and opiates. It is an injection that lasts (1) month. For those with alcohol dependencies I understand detoxing can sometimes be dangerous & life threatening so it is unsafe to take the injection without medical oversight. We received the vivitrol last year for someone who refused to take it. I have a (2) months supply which is sealed & never been opened. The pharmacy sent it directly to our home in a cooler along with the supplies for injection. We were told to have a nurse of MD administer it. A family physician was prepared to administer it for opiate addiction but this never occurred. Opiate detox is not life threatening as alcohol from what I am told. Possibly the vivitrol could be sent to your doctor for administration. I don’t know if this is feasible or of interest to you but I am looking for this very expensive drug to be of benefit to someone in need before it expires. Either way, I wish the very best for you.
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Posted: April 30, 2019, 1:44 AM


Posts: 1
Joined: April 30, 2019



Try to busy your self in something else that fear you.
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Posted: May 14, 2019, 2:22 PM


Posts: 38
Joined: May 5, 2019



Is there a Celebrate Recovery chapter near you? I served on the Leadership Team of my local chapter for 5 years and it's an excellent, faith based recovery program.

Also, I'm a big believer of "you are who you surround yourself with". Get involved in a good church. Before I quit drinking many Sundays I was sitting in church with the worst hangover! I was a very high functioning alcoholic. I'm 58 years old now and on December 27th, I celebrate 16 years of sobriety. Not tooting my own horn - just sharing to encourage you: You got this!

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Posted: July 16, 2019, 11:21 PM


Posts: 32
Joined: July 16, 2019



There are a lot of great suggestions here, but seeking out online A.A. meetings and other message boards aren’t among them.

If you are truly alcoholic, you can't quit drinking for any length of time on your own. That is one reason A.A. works, because it is a "we" program, and regardless of the length of one's sobriety, we all need each other.

Now, I am not saying the Internet resources are not helpful, but that if you are truly alcoholic, these resources unto themselves are not enough.

Is a message board gonna hold your hand when that craving hits you or talk you off a ledge when you find yourself there? No!

If you open up and look at what you have in common with other A.A. meeting attendees, you will see yourself in them and realize you are not alone, but among friends, and that you are not unique.

One poster talked about having an allergy to alcohol, but that is merely a metaphor used in the early days of A.A. before much was known about alcoholism and the Big Book states that A.A. knows but a little about alcoholism on page 164 when it was first published in 1939. The other obvious problem is that Bill expands on that allergy in the 12x12 in the first step as the phenomenon that we find the ability and drive to increasingly drink more, a sign that we are tolerating alcohol better, the exact opposite of a medically recognized allergic reaction.

Another claims: “I was a very high functioning alcoholic.” This is simply a myth, as alcoholism progress, our ability to function in society decreases echoed by the second half of the First Step about our lives being unmanageable. The alternative is that this poster never crossed that line from heavy drinker to alcoholic.
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Posted: July 17, 2019, 6:58 AM


Posts: 6231
Joined: January 5, 2008



Hi sober. I beg to differ. I got sober and I stay sober using online recovery and I have met people who helped me ,influenced me and continue to be there for me if I should need them. I live in a remote place where resources are limited. so this site was my first experience at staying sober. After attending a treatment center I continue to use online resources to receive support ,give support and to pass on Hope and encouragement ...9 years and counting....

This post has been edited by pirate on July 17, 2019, 7:21 AM

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Thank God for what you have. Trust God for what you need
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Posted: July 17, 2019, 12:01 PM


Posts: 32
Joined: July 16, 2019



I knew somebody would object.

Before A.A. came along in the 1930s, there was no effective treatment for alcoholism. Perhaps the most extreme and ineffective treatment was the belladonna or deadly nightshade (poison) treatment which A.A. co-founder Bill W. was subjected to.

By definition, an alcoholic is someone who cannot control their drinking on their own and many will experience a slow torturous death knowing death is in the cards, their compulsion to drink has become more than they can handle on their own.

“Alcoholism or people who can no longer control their use of alcohol, compulsively abuse it despite negative ramifications, and/or experience emotional distress when they are not drinking may be suffering from an alcohol use disorder (AUD) or alcoholism.” www.alcohol.org/alcoholism/.

Smoking is similar. Have you ever seen a smoker with COPD continue to smoke? Isn’t that insane? Why can’t they just quit? The strong compulsion to smoke is why! A.A.'s co-founder Bill W. died of emphysema because he was too stubborn to quit. Quite ironic eh? Done in by an addiction that there is a 12-step program for, his 12 steps, but his 1971 death was 11 years before the founding of Nicotine Anonymous in 1982 by “mostly () Alcoholics Anonymous members who realized their need to focus on their nicotine addiction and to stop smoking.” “Seven Minutes”, September 2005, pg. 1; available at: www.nicotine-anonymous.org/files/DOCS_sevenminutes/SM_2005_September.pdf.

A.A. discovered that there was a powerful bond between recovering/recovered alcoholics and that active alcoholics could use this phenomenon to become abstinent and recover from the effects of their illness.

In the early days new members were hospitalized and then stayed in the home of a recovered alcoholic for a period of time. These early members were the lowest bottom drunks. Today, most alcoholics come in with much higher bottoms but they still need a lot of hand holding and personal interaction in early sobriety to recover and sober alcoholics are willing to do so to remain sober themselves.

What creates this strong bond is that one alcoholic can strongly identify or relate to another, he can see himself in others and find hope, the newcomer no longer feels alone, he feels that others understand him and that he is no longer isolated and no longer unique.

Rehab or treatment centers set an alcoholic up for failure. A patient is kept in a safe environment for a period of time away from externally caused emotional ups and downs, filled with all sorts of self-knowledge, and then released on their own back into the environment that fostered their illness in the first place. Isn’t that insane? This failure was predicted in 1939: “But the actual or potential alcoholic, with hardly an exception, will be ABSOLUTELY unable to stop drinking on the basis of self-knowledge.” “Alcoholics Anonymous”, Chapter 3: More about Alcoholism, pg. 39 (italics removed and capitalization added).

So, what you are telling me is that after gaining self-knowledge and feeling like you are in control of your life again, and with the very limited support of Internet-based resources, you were able to get and remain sober, a feat that not all A.A. meeting attendees can claim. My hat is off to you because you have accomplished the impossible! You are truly a miracle! God has blessed you! You should write a book and call it “Loner Alcoholism Recovery: It Is Now Possible.”

This post has been edited by SoberInMI on July 17, 2019, 12:03 PM
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Posted: July 17, 2019, 12:42 PM


Posts: 6231
Joined: January 5, 2008



Hi Sober. Yes I am a miracle! by the Grace of God, the AA program that I work daily and for all the wonderful people who volunteered their time to help me. I am very grateful to be sober, as for writing a book that should be left up to someone who has more knowledge than me..maybe someone like yourself....

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Thank God for what you have. Trust God for what you need
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Posted: July 17, 2019, 2:25 PM


Posts: 32
Joined: July 16, 2019



*** Message deleted.

This Board is for support and encouragement. It is possible to respectfully disagree without insulting.

Thank you, the moderators ***

This post has been edited by moderator on July 19, 2019, 8:37 AM
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Posted: July 17, 2019, 2:32 PM


Posts: 6231
Joined: January 5, 2008



God bless .. Have a good day...

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Thank God for what you have. Trust God for what you need
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Posted: July 17, 2019, 2:52 PM


Posts: 32
Joined: July 16, 2019



I wish you the same.
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